Events

Past Events

Fragile Families Summer Data Workshop 2014

June 11th-13th, 2014
Columbia School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue @ 122nd St.

The Fragile Families Summer Data Workshop was held June 11th-13th, 2014, at the Columbia School of Social Work in New York City. The Summer Data Workshop series is funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to train early-career scholars on the structure and capabilities of the Fragile Families data, with each year's workshop highlighting a unique feature of the dataset. The 2014 workshop included special sections on the potential for using the data in comparative research, particularly making use of the Millenium Cohort Study, a contemporary birth cohort study from the United Kingdom. See the application website or contact ffdata@princeton.edu or cprc@columbia.edu for infromation about future workshops.

 

CPRC CYF Mini-Conference on SES Disparities in Health and Development

May 19, 2014
Columbia School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue @ 122nd St.

The CYF group held its annual mini-conference on May 19, 2014. The theme this year was “SES disparities in health and development” and the program included three sessions on: disparities in early childhood health and development (presentations by Kimberly Noble and Costas Meghir); disparities in school-age health and development (presentations by Doug Almond, Shakira Suglia, and Bruce Bradbury); and disparities in adolescent and young adult outcomes (presentations by Lena Edlund, Randy Reback, and John Santelli). The mini-conference concluded with a luncheon roundtable with Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Frances Champagne, and Virginia Rauh. You may view the agenda here.

 

First Columbia Global Migration Network Web Conference: "The Health Consequences of Migration: Emerging Directions in Scholarship and Research" 

January 27th, 2014
Columbia School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue @ 122nd St.

On January 27th, 2014, the CPRC hosted an international research conference titled “The Health Consequences of Migration: Emerging Directions in Scholarship and Research.” The event was a global video conference meeting cosponsored by the Columbia University Global Centers and the Columbia Population Research Center. The speakers were comprised of a multi-disciplinary group of scholars from across the world presenting emerging scholarship and research about the health and well-being consequences of migration worldwide. The meeting aimed to clarify key questions in the field with an eye to establishing a global network of migration and health scholars who can continue the conversation, and galvanize scholarship in the area, in the coming decade.

The videoconference featured presenters from Belgium, China, Kenya, Switzerland, and the United States, organized into three panels: Surveillance and Research Challenges, Politics of Migration and Health, and Migration Patterns and Health Challenges. The presentations were followed by a discussion among experts from around the world. The organizing scholars, Julien Teitler and Sandro Galea, moderated the presentations and discussion.

To view all conference documents, including a recording of the meeting, presenter biographies, presentation slides, and more, click here.

 

Fragile Families Summer Data Workshop 2013 

July 8th - July10th, 2013
School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue @ 122nd St.

The Fragile Families Summer Data Workshop was a three-day workshop held at the Columbia School of Social Work from July 8-10, 2013. The event was attended by 39 participants. In total, participants were selected from 104 applicants.

The Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study is a national study that follows a birth cohort of (mostly) unmarried parents and their children, providing information about the capabilities, circumstances, and relationships of unwed parents, the wellbeing of their children, and the role of public policy in family formation and parent and child wellbeing.     

The workshop is designed to familiarize participants with the data available in the study.  The 2013 workshop will include a specialized panel on how the data can be used to examine the effects of the Great Recession on urban families.The workshop curriculum consisted of a detailed introduction to the FFCWS, including specialized training on the use of the FFCWS to study the Great Recession. Presentations included ongoing research on recession-related themes by Professors Irwin Garfinkel and Kristen Harknett, technical detail on the use of macroeconomic indicators with survey data, and hands-on computer training on FFCWS datasets using both micro and macro data.

The Fragile Families Summer Data Workshop 2013 is made possible by Grant Number R25HD074544-01 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD).

Additional information about the Fragile Families study is available here.

Additional information about the workshop, including application form and submission details, is available here.

The Columbia Population Research Center (CPRC) at Columbia University is an NICHD-funded demographic research and training center. CPRC researchers make a significant contribution to population science in the areas of Children, Youth, and Families; HIV/AIDS and Reproductive Health; Immigration/Migration; and Urbanism. 

 

Research to Policy Mini-Conference 2013

April 29th, 2013
School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue @ 122nd St.

Columbia Population Research Center (CPRC) held a Research to Policy mini-conference on Monday, April 29th  at the Columbia University School of Social Work. This was the second conference convened as part of the “research to policy” training initiative. The first, held in May 2011 and focused on translating research to policy, was highly successful. The 2013 conference featured a series of panels on topical areas with researcher and policy presentations,  followed by questions and answers moderated by someone at the interface between research and policy. The first session featured a lively discussion of the costs and benefits of the Million Trees Initiative in NYC. The second focused on the role of research in health care reform, while the third focused on the relative effectiveness of Head Start vs. other early childhood programs. The conference concluded with a lunchtime session showcasing new work, funded by the William T. Grant Foundation, on the role of research in state legislative approaches to obesity prevention and HPV vaccination. Attended by 45 faculty, post-docs, and students from around campus, the conference provided models for how to develop and carry out policy-relevant research and also laid the groundwork for several new researcher-researcher and/or researcher-policymaker collaborations. 

The agenda can be viewed here.

 

Fragile Families Summer Data Workshop 2012

July 11-13, 2012
School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue @ 122nd St.

The Columbia Population Research Center hosted the Fragile Families Summer Data Workshop at the Columbia University School of Social Work. Participants included young scholars from various social and biomedical science disciplines, including advanced graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty. The workshop is designed to familiarize participants with the data available in the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, especially the nine-year follow-up data, which will become publicly available in early 2012.  The national study follows a birth cohort of (mostly) unmarried parents and their children, providing information about the capabilities, circumstances, and relationships of unwed parents, the wellbeing of their children, and the role of public policy in family formation and parent and child wellbeing.

Additional information about the Fragile Families study is available at here

 

New Directions in Measuring Poverty

May 10, 2012
School of Social Work, Room 1255 Amsterdam Avenue @ 122nd St.

This mini-conference featured presentations on the new supplemental poverty measure by David Johnson (U.S. Census Bureau), Tim Smeeding (Institute for Research on Poverty, University of Wisconsin), and Mark Levitan (New York City Center for Economic Opportunity), and a panel discussion with Jason DeParle (New York Times), Heidi Hartmann (Institute for Women’s Policy Research) and Michael Laracy (Annie E. Casey Foundation).

 

Research to Policy Training Workshop

May 24, 2011
School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue @ 122nd St.

Research to Polich Workshop

The CPRC's Developmental Infrastructure Core organized a workshop for faculty, research scientists, post-docs, and doctoral students on Research to Policy Training. The day included an overview on "What is Translation?" by Ken Prewitt, Ph.D., School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University. There was a session on "Building dialogues and co-constructing" with Peter Messeri, Ph.D. and Angela Aidala, Ph.D., Sociomedical Sciences, Columbia University. Geoffrey Knox of Geoffrey Knox and Associates presented on "Working with the media." There was a session on "How do issues get on the public agenda?" by Vicki Lens, M.S.W., J.D., Ph.D., School of Social Work, Columbia University and Constance A. Nathanson, Ph.D., Sociomedical Sciences, Columbia University. The workshop closed with two case studies by Virginia Rauh, ScD, M.S.W., Population and Family Health, Columbia University, and Andrew Rundle, Dr.P.H., Epidemiology, Columbia University.
Agenda

Examining Gene-Environment Interactions in the Social Sciences

May 20, 2011 
International Affairs Building, 420 West 118th St.

Gene Environment Conference

The CPRC's Children, Youth, and Families group, together with the The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholars Gene X Environment Working Group, organized a miniconference on "Examining Gene-Environment Interactions in the Social Sciences." The conference presented emerging work and research using several major datasets (Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing, Add Health, NHANES and WLS).

Agenda

 

Comparative Child and Family Policy: A Conference in Honor of Dr. Sheila B. Kamerman

May 12, 2011
Presidential Level, Columbia Univeristy Faculty House, 64 Morningside Drive @ 116th St.

Kamerman SpeakersThe CPRC's Children, Youth, and Families signature research area group organized a conference to celebrate colleague Sheila B. Kamerman's immense contributions to the field of comparative child and family policy. The CPRC brought together scholars from around the world to provide a scintillating analysis of the current state of child and family policy as well as future directions. Speakers included John Lawrence Aber, Willem Adema, Asher Ben-Arieh, Jonathan Bradshaw, Solrun Engilbertsdottir (for Gáspár Fajth), Jeanne Fagnani, Irwin Garfinkel, Shirley Gatenio Gabel, Neil Gilbert, Janet Gornick, Brenda McGowan, Peter Moss, Niels Ploug, and Jane Waldfogel. Also participating in the program were Jonathan Cole, Geraldine Downey, Ester Fuchs, Sharon Lynn Kagan, Jennifer March-Joly, Kristin Moore, Jane Spinak, and Jeanette Takamura. This conference was made possible with support from The Annie E. Casey Foundation, Anonymous, The Buffett Early Childhood Fund, Columbia University School of Social Work, First Focus, Foundation for Child Development, Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund, and the William T. Grant Foundation.

Program

 

Effects of the Recession on Children and Families

December 9, 2010
School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue @ 122nd St.  

Recession Worskhop

The CPRC's Children, Youth, and Families signature research area group presented a workshop on"Effects of the Recession on Children and Families." The workshop included an overview of the Great Recession by Sheldon Danziger, and three papers by authors at Columbia, Princeton, and the University of Pennsylvania. Click on the talk titles below to access the slides/abstracts provided by the speakers.

AgendaSpeaker Bios

Sheldon Danziger  - “The Great Recession and the Future of Poverty”

Natasha Pilkauskas - “The Great Recession and Material Hardship”

Daniel Schneider - "How did the Great Recession Influence Union Formation and Stability? Evidence from the Fragile Families Study”

Jeanne Brooks-Gunn - “Economic Conditions and Genetic Propensities: The Affect of the Great Recession and Dopamine Receptor Gene DRD2 on Maternal Harsh Parenting”  

 

Disparities in Child Health and Development

May 20, 2010
School of International and Public Affairs, 420 West 118th St. 

Currie Presenting

The CPRC's Children, Youth, and Families signature research area group presented a mini-conference on "Disparities in Child Health and Development." The conference included overviews on disparities research by Janet Currie and Bruce Link, a session on education disparities, and a session on health disparities. Click on the talk titles below to access the slides/abstracts provided by the speakers. 


Agenda Speaker Bios



(Pictured: Janet Currie)  

Bruce Link - “The Social Shaping of Population Health: Implications for Child and Adult Health Inequalities”

Janet Currie - “Linking Disparities in Health and Education”

Jane Waldfogel - “Disparities in School Readiness Across Countries”

Kimberly Noble - “Neuroscience and Disparities in Reading Development”

Randall Reback - “Schools’ Mental Health Services and Young Children’s Emotions, Behavior, and Learning"

Julien Teitler - “Maternal Aging and Disparities in Infant Health”

Joyce Pressley - “The Persistence of Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Fatal Injuries among U.S. Children”

Andrew Rundle - "The Childhood Obesity Epidemic: Transmission Across Generations"

 

Immigration/Migration Research at Columbia

February 19, 2010
School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue @ 122nd St.

Ager PresentingThe CPRC's Immigration/Migration signature research area group presented a mini-conference on Immigration/Migration Research at Columbia. The goal of the conference was to bring together scholars working on immigration/migration research. Two sessions focused on Immigration/Migration and Health and Immigrants and the Labor Market. The final session was a panel discussion on Immigration policy in the US.

Agenda
Speaker Bios

(Pictured: Alastair Ager) 

Lisa Bates- "Immigration and Low Birthweight in the US: The Role of Time and Timing"

Yao Lu- "Health of Migrants and People Left Behind"

Alastair Ager- "Conceptualizing Heath in Relation to Integration Outcomes and Compromises: Contrasts and Commonalities from Studies of Forced Migrants inthe UK and Sierra Leone"

Yinon Cohen- "Selectivity Patterns of Israeli Immigrants in OECD Countries"

Neeraj Kaushal - "Earning Trajectories of High-Educated Immigrants: Does Place of Education Matter?"

David Reimers - Brief History of Immigration in the U.S. (no slides)

Francisco Rivera-Batiz- "Immigration Policy in the US: Where are We?, How did We Get Here?, Where do We Go?"

Rodolfo de la Garza - "A Proposal for Immigration Reform"

 

Children, Youth, and Families Meeting

January 28, 2010 
School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue @ 122nd St.

The Children, Youth, and Families SRAG’s  winter meeting was held on Thursday, January 28, 2010, from 1:00-2:00pm, in the School of Social Work, Room 1109. The agenda included discussing current research projects and planning the annual spring conference, scheduled for Thursday, May 20.

 

HIV/AIDS and Reproductive Health Meeting

October 20
Department of Sociomedical Sciences, 722 West 168th Street

This meeting was an opportunity to learn about data sets available to do population-based research in Vietnam. Colleagues of Jennifer Hirsch, co-director of CPRC's Developmental Infrastructure Core and co-convener of the HIV/AIDS & Reproductive Health SRAG, were visiting from Hanoi and they met with CPRC investigators to walk them through the best of a dozen or so large data sets.The meeting took place under the general aegis of Sociomedical Sciences' Social Science Training and Research (STAR) Partnership (of which Jennifer Hirsch is PI)– an NICHD-funded social science research capacity-building project which represents a five-year collaboration between faculty at Mailman (primarily though not exclusively in SMS) and researchers at some of Vietnam’s leading research institutions. The overall objective of the STAR partnership is to create a national center of excellence in social science approaches to the study of HIV prevention, treatment, and care in Vietnam. A very densely populated country with one of the world’s highest abortion rates, as well as intense rural-urban migration and economic changes which have the country on track to leave behind ‘developing country’ status as early as 2020, Vietnam provides exciting contexts for population research—and the STAR partnership is committed to providing infrastructural support to help develop collaborations between Columbia faculty and our Vietnamese colleagues.


Young Disadvantaged Men: Fathers, Families, Poverty, and Policy

September 14-15, 2009
University of Wisconsin–Madison

CPRC was pleased to co-sponsor a conference on Young Disadvantaged Men: Fathers, Families, Poverty, and Policy with the Institute for Research on Poverty at University of Wisconsin-Madison in September of 2009.The conference brought together scholars and policymakers to examine strategies for reducing barriers to marriage and father involvement, designing child support and other public policies to encourage the involvement of fathers, and coping with fathers who have multiple child support responsibilities. Participating CPRC faculty included Irwin Garfinkel and Ronald B. Mincy. For a full list of presentations, please see the agenda.
Agenda 

The National Children's Study and Birth Cohort Research at Columbia

May 22, 2009
International Affairs Building, 420 W. 118th St.

Pictured: Irv Garfinkel of CPRC (left) & Leo Trasande of Mount Sinai (right).
CYF 2009 Conf

The CPRC's Children, Youth, and Families signature research area group presented a mini-conference on The National Children's Study and Birth Cohort Research at Columbia. The goal of the conference was to bring together researchers working on birth cohort studies, and to highlight Columbia's prominent role in The National Children's Study, a new U.S. birth cohort study that will eventually enroll 100,000 children. To access the presentations, please click on the titles below.

Agenda Speaker Bios

Leo Trasande - National Children's Study Queens Vangard Study

Virginia Rauh - NCS Adjunct Studies

Jeanne Brooks-Gunn - The Fragile Families and Child Well‐being Study: A Multi‐site Birth Cohort 9‐year Study of Mothers, Fathers and Their Children

Stephanie Kasen - What We Have Learned About Trajectories from the Children in the Community Cohort

William P. Fifer - The Perinatal Alcohol Stillbirth and SIDS Cohort: Maternal/Fetal/Infant Phenotypes and Beyond

Ezra Susser - Birth Cohorts: Then and Now (slides available upon request to cprc@columbia.edu)

Alan Brown - In Utero Experience, Child Development, and Health Outcomes in a National Birth Cohort:The Finnish Prenatal Studies (FiPS)

Debbie Lawlor - Collecting Data on Mothers in Birth Cohort Studies: Lessons from ALSPAC

 

Urbanism Brown Bag

May 8, 2009 
School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue @ 122nd St.

At this meeting, led by Peter Messeri, members of the Urbanism Signature Research Area Group discussed next steps for the New York City Initiative, planning for a fall conference on NYC research and data needs, and an R25 on training in use of large data set.

 

Training Workshop: Using the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study Data to Study Marriage and Family

April 29, 2009
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center, Brule B, Level 5

The Columbia Population Research Center (CPRC) sponsored a free 2-hour workshop on the Fragile Families dataset at the PAA’s 2009 Annual Meeting in Detroit, Michigan. The presentation, “Using the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study Data to Study Marriage and Family,” provided an overview of the research design and key components of the data as well as insights into using the data for studying union status and household structure, union history, relationship quality, and fertility. Sixteen attendees from twelve universities attended.

 

HIV/AIDS and Reproductive Health Brown Bag

April 21, 2009
Allan Rosenfield Building, 722 West 168th Street

At this CPRC-sponsored brown bag, Jennifer Hirsch presented an overview of the Social Science Training and Research (STAR) Partnership—an NICHD-funded social science research capacity-building project which represents a five-year collaboration between faculty at Mailman (primarily though not exclusively in SMS) and researchers at some of Vietnam’s leading research institutions. Theo Sandfort presented an overview of the data set from Vietnam’s recently completed first-ever population-based survey on sexuality (for which he provided some input on the instrument development). Drs. Khuat Thu Hong and Le Bach Duong, colleagues at the Institute for Social Development Studies in Vietnam who led the survey project, were in New York visiting SMS in October, and they were available to meet with faculty interested in collaborating with them on writing grants to do secondary analysis on this data set and to discuss other potential projects.
Agenda

 

Research Methods Workshop on Causal Inference in Population and Education Research

February 27, 2009
School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue @ 122nd St.

The Methodology Core held a research methods workshop on "Causal Inference in Population and Education Research," conducted by Stephen Morgan, Associate Professor of Sociology & Director of the Center for the Study of Inequality, Cornell University. Morgan is also the author, together with Christopher Winship, of Counterfactuals and Causal Inference: Methods and Principles for Social Research (Analytical Methods for Social Research). Twenty-nine attendees from across the University were in attendance. To prepare for the workshop, two discussion groups were held. Scroll down for the discussion reading lists.

 

Methodology Core Discussion Group on Causal Effects Estimation through Weighted Regression and Matching

February 12, 2009
Department of Sociomedical Sciences

To prepare for Stephen Morgan's workshop on February 27th, a discussion grouop was held to discuss the following reading:

Morgan, S.L. and Todd, J.J. 2008. A Diagnostic routine for the detection of consequential heterogeneity of causal effects.Sociological Methodology 38(1), 231-281.

 

Methodology Core Discussion Group on Counterfactual Framework for Causal Inference

January 22, 2009
School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue @ 122nd St.

To prepare for Stephen Morgan's workshop on February 27th, a discussion grouop was held to discuss the following readings:

Greg Duncan. 2008. When to promote, and when to avoid, a population perspective. Demography, 45(4): 763-784.

Sharon Schwartz et al. What would have been is not what would be: Counterfactuals of the past and potential outcomes of the future. Forthcoming in Shrout (ed.). Causality and Psychopathology: Finding the Determinants of Disorders and Their Cures

 

New York City Initiative: An Introductory Meeting

September 24, 2008
Agenda

 

Fragile Families Summer Data Workshop 2008

June 30 - July 2, 2008
School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue @ 122nd St.

The Columbia Population Research Center hosted the Fragile Families Summer Data Workshop at the Columbia University School of Social Work. Students from over twenty universities attended. The Fragile Families project staff conducted workshop panels on key Study measures, including parenting; parental relationships; physical and mental health; child development; families' employment and income; incarceration; and interaction with social welfare programs. Additional information about the Fragile Families study is available at: http://www.fragilefamilies.princeton.edu/index.asp

 

Children, Youth, and Families: Early Influences on Later Outcomes

May 16, 2008
International Affairs Building, 420 W 118th St.
Agenda

 

Immigration/Migration Roundtable

May 29, 2007
School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue @ 122nd St.

Agenda

 

A Workshop on Urban Research: The City in a Global World

May 18, 2007
School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue @ 122nd St.
Agenda

 

Children, Youth, and Families: Prenatal Influences - Education Policy - Issues in Adolescence

May 11, 2007
International Affairs Building, 420 W 118th St.
Agenda

 

HIV/AIDS and Reproductive Health: Towards a Cross-Campus Agenda

April 13, 2007