Research Areas

Online Data Extraction Tools

Data Ferret

To access the ACS Public Use Microdata you must download the DataFerrett application or applet. DataFerrett is a data analysis tool with the ability to access many federal, state, local, and private datasets via an internet connection. It can be installed as a stand alone application or be used through an internet browser as a java applet. Users who go through a proxy server on their network might find more success using the applet version than the application version. It is highly recommended that you go through the DataFerrett tutorial before using DataFerrett.

Website: http://dataferrett.census.gov/

IHIS

The Integrated Health Interview Series (IHIS) is a harmonized set of data and documentation based on material originally included in the public use files of the U.S. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and distributed for free over the Internet. IHIS variables are given consistent codes and have been thoroughly documented to facilitate cross-temporal comparisons. The "integration" process is described more fully below.

IHIS is not a collection of compiled statistics; it is composed of microdata. Each record represents a person, with all characteristics of that person numerically coded. These person records are organized into households, making it possible to study the characteristics of people in the context of their families or other co-residents. Because the data refer to individuals and not tables, researchers must use a statistical package to analyze the records in the IHIS database. A data extraction system enables users to select only the survey years and variables they require.

Content taken from: http://www.ihis.us/ihis-action/faq#ques0

Website: http://www.ihis.us/ihis/index.shtml

IPUMS-USA

The Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS-USA) consists of more than fifty high-precision samples of the American population drawn from fifteen federal censuses and from the American Community Surveys of 2000-2009. Some of these samples have existed for years, and others were created specifically for this database. These samples, which draw on every surviving census from 1850-2000, and the 2000-2009 ACS samples, collectively constitute our richest source of quantitative information on long-term changes in the American population. However, because different investigators created these samples at different times, they employed a wide variety of record layouts, coding schemes, and documentation. This has complicated efforts to use them to study change over time. The IPUMS assigns uniform codes across all the samples and brings relevant documentation into a coherent form to facilitate analysis of social and economic change.

IPUMS is not a collection of compiled statistics; it is composed of microdata. Each record is a person, with all characteristics numerically coded. In most samples persons are organized into households, making it possible to study the characteristics of people in the context of their families or other co-residents. Because the data are individuals and not tables, researchers must use a statistical package to analyze the millions of records in the database. A data extraction system enables users to select only the samples and variables they require.

IPUMS-International is the world's largest collection of publicly available individual-level census data. IPUMS-International integrates samples from population censuses from around the world taken since 1960. Scholars interested only in the United States are better served using IPUMS-USA, which is optimized for U.S. research.

IPUMS-CPS is an integrated set of data from the March Current Population Survey (CPS), beginning in 1962 and continuing until the present. This harmonized dataset is also compatible with the data from the U.S. decennial censuses that are part of the IPUMS-USA. Researchers can take advantage of the relatively large sample size of IPUMS-USA at ten-year intervals and fill in information for the intervening years using IPUMS-CPS.

Creating an account: http://usa.ipums.org/usa-action/menu

Content from: http://usa.ipums.org/usa/

IPUMS International

IPUMS-International is an effort to inventory, preserve, harmonize, and disseminate census microdata from around the world. The project has collected the world's largest archive of publicly available census samples. The data are coded and documented consistently across countries and over time to facillitate comparative research. IPUMS-International makes these data available to qualified researchers free of charge through a web dissemination system.

The IPUMS project is a collaboration of the Minnesota Population Center, National Statistical Offices, and international data archives. Major funding is provided by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the Demographic and Behavioral Sciences Branch of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Additional support is provided by the University of Minnesota Office of the Vice President for Research, the Minnesota Population Center, and Sun Microsystems.

Creating an account: https://international.ipums.org/international-action/menu

Content from: https://international.ipums.org/international/

Infoshare

Population statistics, immigration trends, socio-economic indicators, birth and death data, hospitalizations, local economic data, and much more. Infoshare Online is here for you! With Infoshare Online's powerful interface and vast collection of data files, you can
  • Profile an area of your choosing
  • Compare area across a region
  • Produce your own tabulations

Then print your data or save it for use in a variety of popular spreadsheet, presentation, and mapping programs.

Website: http://infoshare.org/

EpiQuery

This interactive system will help you answer health-related questions about your neighborhood, borough and New York City overall with many different types of data.  Learn about death rates, obesity, smoking rates and much more.

EpiQuery is a web-based, user-friendly system designed to guide users through basic data analyses on several datasets. SAS statistical programs run behind the online interface to provide real-time analyses. Users can run cross-tabulations and find point estimates with confidence intervals.

 

Website: https://a816-healthpsi.nyc.gov/epiquery/